Category: mini album

Depeche Mode “Everything Counts and Live Tracks” 1983. Vogue Records/Mute Records, French import mini album. Today, August 22nd, is the release anniversary of Depeche Mode’s third album Construction Time Again (1983) and “Everything Counts” was the lead single, hitting #6 in the UK and #17 on the US Hot Dance chart. Side A, or the Studio Side, has two versions of “Everything Counts” – the 7″ original single mix and the 12″ single mix. The B-side, or the Live Side, has four live tracks (recorded at Hammersmith Odeon in October ‘82) including two Vince Clarke songs, one of my absolute favorites, “New Life,” as well as “Boys Say Go!” – both from their 1981 debut LP Speak and Spell. Also appearing are live versions of the Martin Gore-penned “Nothing to Fear” and “The Meaning of Love,” both from Depeche Mode’s 1982 album A Broken Frame. I left the price tag on the Mini Album because this is an acquisition from my friend Jason who bought it and literally imported it from France in early ‘86.

Duran Duran vs Depeche Mode! I’m spinning both today in preparation for tomorrow evening when I’ll be dancing my ass off at Mad Planet (a retro dance club here in Milwaukee) for its Depeche Mode vs Duran Duran dance night, my two top favorite bands from the 80′s (and both, of course, still active today).  Duran Duran’s “The Reflex” 12″ single (Dance Mix) came out in 1984 and remains one of D2′s most popular songs, hitting #1 in both the US and the UK. Depeche Mode’s Mini Album from 1983 features, on Side A, two versions of “Everything Counts” – the 7″ original single mix and the 12″ single mix; “Everything Counts” was the lead single from their 1983 album Construction Time Again. The B-side has four live tracks (recorded at Hammersmith Odeon in October ‘82) including two Vince Clarke songs, one of my absolute favorites, “New Life,” as well as “Boys Say Go!” – both from their debut LP Speak and Spell. Also appearing are live versions of the Martin Gore-penned “Nothing to Fear” and “The Meaning of Love,” both from Depeche Mode’s 1982 album A Broken Frame. I left the price tag on the Mini Album because this is an acquisition from my friend Jason who bought it in France in early ‘86 on the Vogue record label. Duran Duran will always be my biggest love but if I’m being honesty, Depeche Mode has better, overall, dance tracks. Doesn’t matter, I plan to be out on the floor all night for all the songs.

Trio “Trio – Mini LP” 1982. Six tracks of minimalist new wave German synth-pop, including the hit song “Da Da Da I Don’t Love You You Don’t Love Me Aha Aha Aha” – the EP has the long version which is just a lot longer and even more repetitive than the original, which first appeared on their debut LP Trio in 1981. “Da Da Da” went to #33 on the US Dance chart and to #2 on the UK singles chart.  The repetitiveness of that song (as well as several others on the EP) was intentional; Trio’s “main principle was to remove almost all the ornamentation and polish from their songs, and to use the simplest practical structures (most of their songs were three-chord songs). For this reason, many of their songs are restricted to drums, guitar, vocals, and just one or maybe two other instruments, if any at all. Bass was used very infrequently…” (wiki) The other tracks that employ this formula on the EP are “Anna Let Me In Let Me Out” and “Energie” (which has an identical background beat as “Da Da Da” with a spoken-German introduction before layering over some tropical-flavored guitar effects and rather lo-fi bluesy English-language lyrics). The other three tracks that break from the monotony: “Broken Hearts For You and Me,” which is surprisingly straight-forward classic rock, “Sunday You Need Love Monday Be Alone,” which is a pretty great post-punk rocker, borderline gothic new wave in the vein of early The Cure, and “Ja Ja Ja” which is a breakneck psychobilly punk rocker, complete with hoots and hollers (with a German accent).