Category: crowdedhouse

Everyone quibbles with the selections on Greatest Hits albums and I’m no different. This is a decent collection, gathering most of Crowded House’s good stuff, but it should have been done chronologically and it should have dumped some of those terrible Together Alone tracks (their weakest album) for lost gems on Temple of Low Men, like “Into Temptation.” Also, the omission of “World Where You Live” from the debut album is a sin. Nonetheless, the Woodface album—virtually a greatest hits album all on its own—is well represented and most of the other crowd-pleasing singles are here, too. 


CROWDED HOUSE Crowded House. 2000 UK limited edition ‘Simply Vinyl’ 10-track LP pressed on Audiophile quality 180 Gram Virgin Vinyl, the groups debut album including Mean to Me, World Where You Live, Now We’re Getting Somewhere, Don’t Dream It’s Over and Something So Strong; picture sleeve with lyric insert, Simply Vinyl insert and still in the company PVC jacket. The sleeve displays just a little light wear whilst the vinyl looks barely played.

Available from https://eil.com/shop/moreinfo.asp?catalogid=165810 #eildotcom #eil #records #vinyl #rarerecords #rarelps #rock #pop #cratedigging #vinyljunkie #vinylcollection #recordcollection #vinylporn #instavinyl #crowdedhouse

(at Meopham)
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This one’s kind of neat, kind of odd—a promo 45 from Japan with a live version of “Don’t Dream It’s Over” on one side and an etching of their name on the other side. It’s intriguing not only for that cool etching but also the typography of the etching itself is from their second album, while DDIO is a song from their first album. My guess is that their record company there released this to radio stations to coincide with a tour. 


A goody promo album I got as a college intern—a bazillion Capitol Records acts wishing you a Merry Christmas. It was meant for radio stations to play between songs, and is probably the only album ever to include Anne Murray, MC Hammer and Megadeth.

Picked this up over the weekend and gave it a listen last night. While we all know “Bittersweet Symphony” and its hypnotic, undulating vibe, I had forgotten most of the rest of the album. With 20 years separation between then and now, the Oasis influence is easy enough to spot, but what I didn’t see at the time was the songwriting debt to Neil Finn and Crowded House, readily apparent once you get to the second half of the album. Even if its derivative, it’s still an interesting record.

Two early-1990s UK singles from a classic album—“Weather With You” and “Fall At Your Feet”from Crowded House’s “Woodface.” Classic pop bliss.

New Neil Finn
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Oh, Split Enz were a complicated group, and a prime example is this trio of album (yes, that’s “album” singular).
Their first LP, back when they were a cross between Gabriel-era Genesis and a demented vaudeville troupe, was called Mental Notes, and it came out in 1975 in Australia; that’s the one on the bottom left. It is a WEIRD freakin’ album and the impressive cover painting was done by a band member, Phil Judd (brown suit jacket in center
Then they moved to London, re-recorded half the Mental Notes album and released those tracks with the remaining original tracks as their second album, calling it Second Thoughts. That’s the album on top, and arguably it’s really a 1.5 album instead of a second album proper. Its cover is a photo and if you look close, you can spot Judd in front—by this point, he had shaved his head (a rare sight in 1976) and PAINTED HAIR on to his head.
Somewhere around this time, Split Enz finally got signed in the U.S., so they released Second Thoughts as their U.S. debut (bottom right)…but they called it Mental Notes. And used the Judd painting, except that he now had altered it, painting out his hair. No question, Judd was an odd guy, but his best work was still ahead of him, when he led Schnell-Fenster through its forgotten, brilliant alt-pop debut, The Sound of Trees, in 1990.